Species-Reptiles

The Biosfera, works with this sort in the gathering of samples (muscle of the tail) for DNA; gathering of dejetos to study his diet; measurement (of the snout even to the sewer) and micro placing chipe pit tag to know it location and distribution of the sort (tarentola).

 

 

 

 

Bouvier's Leaf-toed Gecko Hemidactylus bouvieri (bocourt, 1870)

Earth Reptile

Global Distribution: This gecko is endemic to the Cabo Verde Islands were it has been recorded on the islands of São Vicente, Santo Antão and São Nicolau. The subspecies Hemidactylus bouvieri razonensis has been recorded from two members of the Desertas island group (Santa Luzia and Raso). Its continued presence on Santiago and Brava is uncertain, since the records of the species are ancient. The species has also been reported from Fogo Island, the attribution of historical Fogo records is uncertain following the recent description of H. lopezjuradoi.

Food: It is omnivorous, feeding on both plant and animal matter.

Threat Category: Critically endangered.

Threats to Conservation: Very restricted distribution, (less than 100 km2), habitat fragmentation and destruction, introduction of invasive species (cats, rats, goats), potential direct competition with non-native species of gecko (e.g. African gecko Hemidactylus angulatus and H. Mercatorius) and poor knowledge of its ecology.

 

 

 

Bouvier's Leaf-toed Gecko from Raso Hemidactylus bouvieri razoensis (Gruber & Schleich, 1982)

Earth Reptile

Global Distribution: This gecko occurs only on the island of Santa Luzia and Raso´s islet.

Food: It is omnivorous, feeding on both plant and animal matter.

Threat Category: Critically endangered.

Threats to Conservation: The specie is particularly at risk due to the introduction of cats and rodents, which have only recently settled in Santa Luzia in large numbers. Human pressure on both islands has been increasing, bringing with a greater risk of these invasive species. Other threats to the conservation of this subspecies are that both islands are especially prone to severe droughts, habitat destruction and little known ecology.

 

 

 

 

Raso Wall Gecko Tarentola raziana (Schleich, 1984)

Earth Reptile

Global Distribution: This specie is found on the island of Santa Luzia and Branco and Raso's islets at altitudes below 300m.

Food: It is omnivorous, feeding on both plant and animal matter.

Threat Category: Almost threatened.

Threats to Conservation: With a very limited distribution (28km2), the greatest threat to this species are the mammals introduced in Santa Luzia (cats and rats), which to date have not reached Branco and Raso’s islets. Although still relatively abundant in Santa Luzia, human pressure and their non-native predators have been increasing, posing a considerable threat to their long-term conservation. Another threat to its conservation is due to poor knowledge of the ecology of the species.

 

 

 

Giant Wall Gecko Tarentola gigas (Bocage, 1875)

Earth Reptile

Global Distribution: This gecko, predominantly nocturnal, is restricted to Branco and Raso’s islets with a combined area of 10 km2. In the islet of Raso, the larger of the two islands, is mainly confined to the south coast and the central plain. Fossil evidence proves that this species has already been widely disseminated but has disappeared from São Vicente and Santa Luzia after human settlement and the introduction of invasive species.

Food: It feeds on broken eggs and possibly bird nests, being the main (and perhaps only) natural predator of eggs of Raso Lark (Alauda razae), a bird now restricted to the Raso’s islet. In Branco’s Islet, where there is no longer Raso Lark, feeding is presumed to be based mainly on colonies of Cape Verde Shearwater (Calonectris edwardsii).

Threat Category: In danger.

Threats to Conservation: Restricted distribution, human pressure and changes in the dynamics of the relationships established with the native species of seabirds and terrestrial birds. In the islet of Raso, this species depends on the colonies of seabirds present, as well as on the population of Raso Lark (Alauda razae) that is subject to extreme fluctuations, provoked by the climate and currently listed as critically endangered.

 

 

Giant Wall Gecko from Raso Tarentola gigas gigas (Bocage 1875)

Earth Reptile

Global Distribution: It occurs in the Raso's islets at low altitudes.

Food: It takes advantage of regurgitated remains, broken eggs and juvenile infeasible of seabirds and terrestrial birds, being probably predator of Raso Lark’s (Alauda razae) eggs.

Threat Category: In danger.

Threats to Conservation: Climate change, which can lead to extreme droughts, changes in the dynamics of relationschips established with native species, such as seabirds on which they depend in terms of food, very restricted distribution and human disturbance, make this species vulnerable and in need of measures.

 

 

 

 

 

Giant Wall Gecko from Branco Tarentola gigas brancoensis (Schleich, 1984)

Earth Reptile

Global Distribution: It exists in the islets of Branco and Raso, at low altitudes.

Food: It takes advantage of regurgitated remains, broken eggs and juvenile infeasible of seabirds and terrestrial birds, being probably predator of Raso Lark’s (Alauda razae) eggs.

Threat Category: In danger.

Threats to Conservation: Climate change, which can lead to extreme droughts, changes in the dynamics of relationschips established with native species, such as seabirds on which they depend in terms of food, very restricted distribution and human disturbance, make this species vulnerable and in need of measures.

 

 

 

 

 

Stanger's Skink  Chioninia stangeri  (Gray, 1845)

Earth Reptile

Global Distribution: It is an endemic species of the Cabo Verde archipelago, with an estimated distribution of 101 km2, occupying the island of São Vicente and the Desertas Islands (Santa Luzia Island and Branco and Raso islets), mostly at altitudes below 250m.

Food: It is omnivorous, eating vegetable and animal matter. The invertebrates are the largest portion of the diet.

Threat Category: Almost threatened.

Threats to Conservation: It is thought that its low abundance in Santa Luzia is due to the impact of invasive species such as cats and rats. It is not clear whether these animals pose a threat on other islands like São Vicente. Climate change, such as extreme drought, is another threat to its conservation.

 

 

 

 

 


The Biosfera, works with this sort in the accounting of tracks and nests; nests marking for GPS; measurement and weighing of baby animals; rescue of the lost or disorientated females and gathering of genetic materials, in partnership with the University Queen Mary.

 

Loggerhead Turtle Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758)

Marine Reptile

Global Distribution: As a migratory species, the common marine turtle is distributed globally throughout the subtropical regions (of which Cabo Verde is part) and temperate Mediterranean Sea and Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Oceans.

Food: Crustaceans, mollusks and fish.

Threat Category: Vulnerable.

Threats to Conservation: The main threats are: accidental capture in fishing gears targeting other species loss of nesting habitat due to coastal development, direct catch for human consumption or use in commercial products, marine pollution that kills or maim adults and cubs through ingestion or entanglement, light pollution from artificial lights that lead to disorientation of adults and cubs on land and finally climate change that has detrimental impacts on their nesting areas.